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GSXR Slipper Clutch Upgrade (pic heavy)

Discussion in 'Mechanical & Technical' started by InvisibleMan, Sep 27, 2010.

  1. A few weeks ago, I stumbled across an obscure post on a 2 yr old thread on the WMRRA forum that said the K5 thru K8 GSXR 1000 slipper clutch will drop right in my K1. In a matter of minutes, I was on Ebay to see just what one of these slipper clutches would cost me. A few days later, I sniped a K6 slipper clutch for $85 shipped. Well, hell? I'll just be having that then! A few days later, it was in my hand and I had the service manual downloaded to make sure I received all the right parts. Here's how it went. Enjoy!

    Bodywork off, clutch cover removed and now, it's time to dig in on this thing.
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    Off with the clutch springs.
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    Here come the old burned up drive and friction plates.
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    Remove the clutch pushrod thing and get at that hub.
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    Instead of buying the tool to hold the clutch hub, I just pop rivet a friction and drive plate together to keep everything from spinning. Yeah, it's kinda ghetto but, making my own tool works every time.
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    The bearing has to come out first to get enough clearance on the clutch basket to remove it. No problem.
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    Old one drops right out.
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    New one drops right in.
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    Now, it's time for the super special, back torque eliminating, slipper parts to go in.
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    Thrust washer in place and the new clutch hub goes into active duty.
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    Washers and nut go on, electric impact gun gets to work, nut is center punched.
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    Time for more special slipper clutch parts.
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    Time to lube up all the friction/drive plates and install in the correct order.
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    Install new adjustable pushrod and throwout bearing.
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    Time to install springs.
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    Now, all that is left is to adjust the clutch pushrod, install a new gasket, fill'er up with oil and give it a test ride.
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    Easy peasy!

    I saw Hinson aftermarket slipper clutches going for $1100 or more. So, $85 and a little bit of my spare time was a deal I couldn't pass up. Now, I think my corner entries at the track days should be a little easier on my meat head riding style of spinning the shit outta the engine going into turns. My lack of any semblance of smooth riding should be less of an issue now. Can't wait to give it a try at Spocaine next weekend. Yeehar!
     
  2. Dr. E

    Dr. E Theoretical Propagandist

    5,632
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    Excellent write up and great pictures!
     

  3. james1300

    james1300 Track School Dazed

    +1
     
  4. Glad everyone liked it. I had one problem with the clutch pushrod adjustment screw. There was enough room when I put the clutch cover back on but, there wasn't an extra 2 mm needed when the clutch lever was pulled in. I had to shorten the screw by 5 mm and now, it all works the way it should.

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    Time for a test ride.
     
  5. dont the newer bikes have an access hole in the cover so you can adjust that without removing the entire cover?
     
  6. It does have a clutch pushrod adjustment on the sprocket side too but, that didn't seem to have enough range for what I needed to lose. It was pretty easy to lop it off with the dremel tool and thread it back in. I really should have noticed the problem before I filled it up with fresh oil though. Doh.
     
  7. Update on how this thing works.

    On the street, it's not really noticeable at all, except for the fact that it's a new clutch and doesn't suck like the old one with 43,000 miles on it. The clutch used to work like a light switch, on/off.

    On the track, it's a night and day difference. Banging gears out of it going into turns was soooo much better. I was at Spokane this weekend and blew turn 9 earlier in the day and being in the wrong gear, on the brakes, it just kinda snaked around a little but, the rear wheel didn't jack hammer like it used to. Later, I blew turn 4 and the same thing. Just a controlled recovery. The slipper clutch really smooths out my not-so-smooth riding style. I could just bang gears out of it at high revs and go spinning into turns without worrying about the rear wheel driving the engine and getting the back end out of control.

    I highly recommend this upgrade, if possible. Me likey.
     
  8. Sorry but how do you connect the oil pump sprocket , that is behind?
     
  9. Slipper clutches are the best, don't see why they aren't a standard thing. The one in my Monster makes every downshift smooth as butter, even if I fail to perfectly rev match.