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SV1000 Fork seal replacement

Discussion in 'Mechanical & Technical' started by RedKat600, Mar 27, 2013.

  1. RedKat600

    RedKat600 Vintage Screwball Staff Member

    Well, that went a lot better than I thought it would! All done in about 3 hours. If I hadn't mis-assembled the first fork I would have been done sooner. As it is, I put the spacer in first....had to dump out the measured oil, remove spacer, refill with oil, suck out extra oil and start all over again. Forks are back on the bike but the front wheel is still off. WOOOT! I getta ride this weekend!

    So let's see....first, start by removing your forks from your bike. If you can do that, you can replace the seals. THen getcha one of these in 8 MM variety.

    [​IMG]

    See? Just long enough! HA, that's what she said!

    [​IMG]

    Then this yucky nasty crap comes out the bottom and makes a mess until you get it over the bucket.

    [​IMG]

    Then, CAREFULLY clap the tube in a vise. I mean carefully. 22MM wrench will get the top loose....and you will see this!

    [​IMG]

    Remove the slotted cap.

    Then, use a 17 MM wrench on the nut and a 14MM wrench on the BLUE preload adjuster on the top. Loosen and remove.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Pull off the white spacer and set it aside. Remove the damper rod assembly and spring too. Now for the fun part. The seal is still in there. Remove the CLIP on the top of the seal carefully with a small screwdriver.

    [​IMG]

    Hold the fork TUBE between your feet and use the chrome tube as a slide hammer to remove the seal. Don't pull too hard, it will take a few whacks to drive the old seal out. And you'll be rewarded with this.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Don't forget about this guy at the bottom of the tube!!

    [​IMG]


    Now, clean all your parts! Mine had some fine metal powder in it, this is normal because metal parts are sliding past each other.

    So, everything is clean, right? RIGHT? Good. Put the lower fork tube in a vise, CAREFULLY! Don't want to mar that pretty paint, do we?

    Slide the bushing and washer back on the fork. Remember these parts? Also, drop the little aluminum spacer back into the bottom, patterned side DOWN.

    [​IMG]

    Insert the damper rod assembly into the chrome fork tube and carefully lower the whole thing back into the fork tube. Now, get the bolt you removed earlier...the one with the copper sealing washer? Yup, that one. Start the bolt back in and hand snug it. Then use the impact on a LOW setting and tighten it up. CAREFULLY! Don't wanna break things.

    So, you've got your new seal. Which way does it go? I got factory Suzuki parts. Has a yellow dot on it. That side goes UP!

    [​IMG]

    This side goes down.

    [​IMG]

    You wanna know what makes a really, REALLY good seal driver? Shop vac extension. Yup, not kidding at all. Perfect size with a nice wide surface so you don't damage the new seal. HAHA!

    [​IMG]

    Drive the seal down so it's past the groove.

    [​IMG]

    Then insert our friend, the clip. Use a small screwdriver to press fully into place if needed. Now, fill with oil up to maybe 6" from the top. Grab the damper rod assembly in the center and work it up and down until the action is smooth and there is no more gurgling of air. Add a bit more oil. Factory says 162MM from the top of the fork tube. I went 140MM cuz people said that was the hot tip. Your mileage may vary.

    So, got the oil done? Great! Drop the spring in, WIDE GAP COILS at the top!! Very important.

    [​IMG]

    Add our buddy the white spacer.

    [​IMG]

    Then the metal cap, depressed side down.

    [​IMG]

    Now for the locknut. Factory manual states the nut must be 11MM from the top of the threads. Measure, measure again, hold the nut and install the fork cap.

    [​IMG]

    Then, snug up with your 17 and 14 MM wrenches. Grab the fork tube, slide it up and start turning. Snug the cap into the fork tube. Almost done! Don't forget the dust wipers...clean those up and re-use if you can or install new ones. Hey, we're done! Not that painful.
     
  2. Great write up!


    Pro-tip: pop the cap while its still in the bike so you don't have to clamp the slider.

    I assume you got away with just using the impact driver instead of needing a special tool?

    Also, next time ditch the progressives for straight rate!


    Posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire
     

  3. RedKat600

    RedKat600 Vintage Screwball Staff Member

    If you use the impact, you MUST leave the cap tight and also screw the preload down all the way so the damper rod doesn't spin. This is why I left it on until after the bolt in the bottom was out.

    Lack of funds due to Honda engine rebuild prevented upgrades while I was in there but I agree with ya!
     
  4. pull the wheel, pop the lower bolt out, pop the top, pull the forks :nana

    it's easy to sit here in seattle and type...


    btw. how I got my damper rod out was this:
    2 nuts on a 20mm rod at the end, locked together, 2 nuts on the top.
    similar allen bolt on the bottom...no way to turn both with one set of hands, so I stuck the stocket handle through my strap eye on my moto table and put my foot down to keep it from spinning the eye. no wrench that will do 30mm, so I used channel locks. I'm not going to say it worked well, but it got the job done :mrgreen:

    impact driver is high on my list
     
  5. I was impressed with the Ryobi lithium one from Home Depot. It was fairly cheap since I already had the drill/battery/charger combo. A good option if you don't have air, or want a cordless. With the slim battery, if it is fully charged it has no issues doing a tire rotation on my truck. I'm sure the higher capacity battery would be even better.
     
  6. battery tools are great when they are new, but corded tools are where it's at.

    I only use battery tools for when I really only want to get half the job done.


    I have a small air compressor that will run a small impact wrench for a short time, and I think that's all I really want/need.
     
  7. RedKat600

    RedKat600 Vintage Screwball Staff Member

    Holy. Crap.

    Rode the bike to work this morning and the difference is night and day! No more leaks!

    I used 10 WT oil, compression and rebound are 1.5 turns out from full and preload is 3 lines showing on the blue cap. When I hit the front brakes the front end no longer heads for China either! Soaks up the bumps well.....might spend some time playing with adjustments depending on how it corners.

    Worth every bit of time I spent and worried about this.
     
  8. PeteN95

    PeteN95 Moderator Staff Member

    Nice job, but definitely easier than the GSXR forks!
     
  9. RedKat600

    RedKat600 Vintage Screwball Staff Member

    :mrgreen:

    Yeah, not sure I'd want to tackle USD forks. They require special tools...I can't just get lucky and bypass that part.
     
  10. Great write up RedKat! Thanks a lot for doing it this way, this is a much better run through than the ones I've seen before. Where did you pick up your 8mm Impact bit?
     
  11. RedKat600

    RedKat600 Vintage Screwball Staff Member

    I got a complete kit that's 6 MM through something like 14MM from Napa. It was 50 bucks and has 6 impact allen bits in 1/2" drive.

    Most welcome! It was a good learning experience. Now I can pass it on to others!
     
  12. PeteN95

    PeteN95 Moderator Staff Member

    But the tools are easy to make with PVC pipe and threaded rod.
     
  13. Nice write up! Thank you! It helped to refresh my memory.
    One thing I do want to point out. You say to put the WIDE Gap on Top. That is wrong. The SV1000/S manual states this:
    Install the fork spring . NOTE: The close pitch end of the fork spring should be at the top of the front fork. (You can see it in the pic as well)
    http://www.edubs.net/bikestuff/sv1000/sv1000_2003ServiceManual/6_Chassis.pdf
    After 41k miles and 7 years on my SV, I have to say that my forks have never worked batter than now, with Ravenol Ultra Light 2.5 weigh oil. It is really smooth and fluid now. It has always felt like they had tar in them. :)
    I have the rebound and compression turned in slightly to firm up the ride. (~1 turn)
    That said, I am an avid knee dragger...no chicken strips on my SV! It now handles like it always should have. I did put on an 07 GSXR1000 rear shock/spring years ago and that made a very nice improvement. All the best!
     
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